The Team

Jason Verley

Jason Verley is the Xyce Project Lead and a Senior Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department at Sandia National Laboratories. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Physics from the Colorado School of Mines in 2000, after which he did postdoctoral research with the Solid-State Spectroscopy group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Jason joined Sandia in 2001, working in the Microelectronics Development Lab (now part of MESA) as a Metrology Process Engineer. His work at Sandia has also included photolithography process engineering, FTIR and emission spectroscopy of photonic microstructures, and optoelectronic simulations using TCAD software. Jason joined the Xyce Project in 2012, where his focus has been compact models for semiconductor devices in radiation environments. His current research interests include semiconductor device physics and advanced computational techniques for circuit simulations on next-generation computing platforms.

Eric Keiter

Eric R. Keiter is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff and the Research Lead for the Xyce circuit simulator project. He was the Xyce Project Lead from 2003 to 2016, and has been part of the Xyce simulation project since its inception in 1999. In addition to guiding overall Xyce code development, he also develops compact models specific to hostile environments. He received his Ph.D. degree in Materials Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1996. From 1996 to 1998, he was a postdoc at the University of Illinois in the electrical engineering department, where he did research on dust simulation in inductively coupled plasmas. His interests include compact modeling, parallel computing, TCAD, plasma simulation, and algorithms for circuit simulation. Dr. Keiter was a co-recipient of the 2008 R&D 100 Award for the Xyce circuit simulator.

Thomas Russo

Thomas V. Russo is a Senior Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department, a developer on the Xyce project since 2000, and the project's Product Lead. He received an M.A. in Physics from Hunter College of CUNY in 1986, studying nonlinear dynamics of conservative dynamical systems. He continued work in nonlinear dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems and in time integration algorithms at the University of Texas at Austin from 1986 to 1990. He received his M.Phil and Ph.D. in chemical Physics at Columbia University in 1992, having worked on pseudospectral algorithms for the solution of Hartree-Fock equations for electronic structure of large molecules. He was a postdoc in the Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Physics group at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1992 to 1995, developing codes for density functional theory on molecules, especially transition metal complexes. He has been at Sandia National Laboratories since 1995, and has worked on density functional theory codes for solid-state systems, device physics codes, and electronic circuit simulation including models for hostile environment simulation.

Richard Schiek

Rich is a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department at Sandia National Laboratories where he works on device development and simulation output metrics. He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois in 1991 and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University in 1993 and 1996 respectively. As an undergraduate, his research focused on simulating 2µ plasmid replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a graduate student he researched non-local, fluid and transport mechanics in micro-scale domains of bound, Brownian suspensions of particles. After graduation, Richard worked at a medical device start-up company developing wound closure technologies which utilized sub-micron fibers for strength. In 2000, Rich joined the staff at Sandia National Laboratories where he worked on topological reconstruction of MEMS designs and later joined the Xyce team in 2004.

Heidi Thornquist

Heidi Thornquist is a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department at Sandia National Laboratories, where she develops scalable linear solvers for circuit simulation. After receiving her M.A. in Computational and Applied Mathematics from Rice University, Heidi joined Sandia National Laboratories in 2003 as a lead developer of the Anasazi eigensolver and Belos linear solver package in the Trilinos Project. In 2006, she received her Ph.D. in Computational and Applied Mathematics from Rice University and joined the Xyce Project. Her recent research is centered around advanced numerical algorithms and software for scalable time-domain and frequency-domain circuit simulation that are targeted to next-generation computing platforms.

Ting Mei

Ting Mei is a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department at Sandia National Laboratories. She received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2006. Ting has been part of the Xyce project since she joined Sandia National Laboratories in 2007. Her research focus is on novel algorithms and numerical simulation techniques for analog, RF and mixed signal systems. She has served on the Technical Program Committee of DAC and ICCAD.

Pete Sholander

Pete Sholander is a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department at Sandia National Laboratories. He received his M.S. from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include information assurance, sensor systems, wireless communications and telecommunications. Previous employers include AT&T Bell Labs and Ford, amongst others. Pete joined the Xyce Project in 2013.

Karthik Aadithya

Karthik Aadithya is a Senior Member of Technical Staff in the Electrical Models & Simulation Department at Sandia National Laboratories. He obtained his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2016 from UC Berkeley (under advisor Jaijeet Roychowdhury). His research is focused on developing algorithms and computational techniques for accurately modeling, analyzing, simulating, verifying, and debugging current- and next-generation electronic and biological systems. Aadithya joined the Xyce Project in 2016.